CALENDARIO DI COLTIVAZIONE DELLA CANNABIS PER L'EUROPA

CANNABIS CULTIVATION CALENDAR FOR EUROPE

Whether you live in northern or southern Europe, let us help you sprout at the right time for vigorous vegetation and bountiful harvests.

Timing is everything, and this consideration couldn't be more appropriate for growing cannabis outdoors. You may be wondering: "Do you have to live in a Mediterranean climate for plants to bloom?". In fact, you can achieve a successful harvest by making the most of the conditions in your region and planning your cultivation appropriately. So how do you do it? Let us guide you through the entire outdoor growing process — including strain selection, when to germinate, transplant, trim, train and more — so you can produce superior quality weed no matter where you are. We have thought of everything.

THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN EUROPE

The differences between northern and southern Europe

What better place to start than with the location itself. How you plan for the rest of your outdoor grow will largely depend on the local climate. Today, cannabis plants are much more resilient and robust, but they still need to be grown at the right time to thrive and avoid potential problems.

Whether you live in northern and southern Europe, each territory brings its own advantages and pitfalls to cannabis cultivation. So, it's crucial to work with what you have and try to mitigate what you don't have.

For example, although growers living in colder climates may not benefit from the heat and sunshine of the southern regions, they may not have to deal with the pest and mold level of Mediterranean growers. Additionally, some varieties are naturally cold hardy and prefer cooler average temperatures. That said, growers in these areas will have to contend with an overall shorter growing season.

Of course, those who grow weed outdoors in southern Europe will find themselves with an abundance of direct sunlight and heat, which also means early germination and late harvest. However, as the temperature rises, more maintenance is likely required to ensure that the plants are well cared for and able to perform to the best of their ability. And, while some cultivars may fall victim to pests and plagues when neglected, some varieties are naturally prepared to thrive in hot, muggy conditions.

VARIETIES SUITABLE FOR NORTHERN CLIMATES

Variety suitable for northern climates

With the varieties in mind, we can start talking about the ideal choices for different climates. When it comes to growing in Northern Europe, indica-dominant strains are the best choice, as are autoflowering strains. Since the cannabis diaspora over 12,000 years ago, indicas have developed genetic characteristics dictated by their evolution in cold mountainous regions, with early, intense winters and short summers.

Autoflowering strains have a number of advantages in colder environments, one of which is that they do not depend on sunlight to transition from the vegetative to the flowering stage. This also allows for a faster growth cycle and allows some growers (even those located in northern climates) to potentially harvest several crops during a single season. Indica autos have dual cold tolerance and fast flowering genetics, making them a viable option for growing cannabis in colder climates.

VARIETIES SUITABLE FOR SOUTHERN CLIMATES

Varieties suitable for southern climates

Southern climates are characterized by warmer average temperatures, longer days, and longer growing seasons. Originally, cannabis evolved in these types of climates, prior to its dispersal around the world. As with other plants, cannabis genetics also have something profound that makes them thrive in warm, sunny and humid climates.

Growers located in hot, dry microclimates will be able to grow any variety they desire. That said, most sativa strains are very tolerant of direct sunlight, while some indicas, for example, perform better with some shade periods.

Humid coastal microclimates still benefit from plenty of sunshine, but humidity can be a challenge, especially during flowering when bud density increases significantly. Pests, pathogens, and molds are more likely to show up when an area experiences regular sea mist, fog, or rain, so selecting cultivars that are known to be mold resistant is recommended. Highly resinous plants tend to fight mold better than plants with less resin. Likewise, airy and fluffy sativa buds are better equipped to resist bud rot than denser, bushy indicas.

As you can see, regardless of whether you live in a northern or southern part of Europe, the seed options are extensive.

So, now that you are aware of which types of cultivars are best suited to your environment, it's time to plan your grow. Below, we'll break down what you should (and shouldn't) do each month if you grow in Northern Europe. Ranging from germination to eventual harvesting, no time has to be wasted throughout the year to produce truly sublime buds. Note that the following guide is based on photoperiod feminized cannabis strains - we'll talk about autoflowers later.

PREPARATION (FEBRUARY)

As arguably the most important step in any grow project, preparation includes everything from purchasing seeds and grow accessories to planning an ideal location.

When it comes to accessories, think about your growing area. Is it an open plot of land? Or a cramped balcony ? This will greatly affect your purchases, as it will determine whether you will need to purchase grow containers and what type and size. While a large fabric pot might work for outdoor growers with access to flower beds, this is less viable for those with a small balcony. So it's best to do your research and be realistic when shopping around.

In addition to a selection of containers and accessories, providing plants with the right level of nutrients is also of the utmost importance. There are several types of nutrients available that cater to all different stages of plant growth. For example, it could be soils rich in nutrients that are particularly important for a certain stage of life, or additional fertilizers. There are many types of nutrients available to help your plants. So, if you feel this is something you are looking to implement in your grow project, be sure to check it out.

As discussed above, seed selection is crucial for successful cultivation. Based on the information provided above, consider which strains are most likely to thrive in the environment you create for them. As discussed, indica-dominant varieties are the safest choice in Northern Europe, although specific cultivars may be more suitable than others, so do proper research to find a good candidate.

GERMINATION / SOWING (MARCH AND APRIL)

Once you have your seeds and accessories and the weather starts to warm up slightly, it's time to kick off your grow project. This is generally done in the spring months of March and April.

When it comes togermination , this can be achieved in a number of ways. Germination pots, such as the Smart Start, provide seeds with the perfect amount of soil to germinate in a short amount of time. A dedicated kit, complete with propagator , will simulate the conditions of the greenhouse, giving the seeds the high level of humidity necessary to hatch. However, other methods may work as well, such as placing the seeds between damp paper towels or dropping them into a glass of water, but will produce mixed results.

While you can theoretically sow directly into the ground, it is likely too early to do it outdoors. As a general rule, seeds should be sprouted indoors, as they should be monitored, cared for and kept warm so they can germinate.

Once the seeds have grown into seedlings with a couple of "real" leaves, you can move them to larger containers, ready to grow outdoors.

MOVING OUTDOORS (MAY)

The ideal time to prepare plants for upcoming sunlight and summer heat is mid-spring. Even in the coldest climates, with temperatures averaging 12–15 ° C, if there is no risk of frost or heavy cold rain, your young plants will thrive simply from being exposed to the sun's rays.

To transplant into a larger container or bed, loosen the soil around the seedling and you should be able to remove it from its container, complete with surrounding soil. Now, it's simply a matter of giving it a new home in a dedicated flower bed or larger container. As mentioned, this will mostly depend on the limits of your space.

From here, it is essential to ensure that your vegetatively growing plants have access to plenty of nutrients and to find a watering schedule that works for your grow. Don't fall victim to excess water. Once your plants are acclimated and happy in their new environment, you can start considering training methods to get the best possible yield.

TRAINING, TOpping, PRUNING (JUNE, JULY, AUGUST)

It's no secret that plants can grow a little unruly when left to their own devices, so keeping them in check is vital. During the peak of the vegetative phase (June and July), sunlight should be at its most available. While you can let the plants flower naturally, those looking to maximize yields can consider the various training methods.

LST (low stress training) is an effective and direct way to increase plant health and production. This is achieved by bending and tying the main stem of the plant, which encourages lateral growth and more even light distribution. So instead of producing an apical bud, the plants will have the potential to produce an abundance of buds at different sites. It may take some practice to master, but it's easily achievable even for novice growers.

Another slightly more advanced method is topping . When your plant reaches around 30cm in height, it's time to make the cut. Take your pruning shears and cut the main stem just above the fifth knot. While this may seem like you are spoiling the plant, it will compensate by producing two apex buds instead of one, resulting in larger yields.

Finally, maintain a regular pruning ritual throughout the vegetative phase . Many choose to cut off the lower branches so the plant can focus its energy in areas closest to the light. But be careful not to overdo it, as excessive pruning can stun and stop growth. Whenever you inflict any kind of high-stress technique like this one, the plants will need at least a week to recover, so prune sparingly.

As the weeks go by, you will notice that your plant will really start to gain mass. Continue maintenance and your plant should easily transition into the flowering phase .

Photoperiod grass plants flower naturally when daylight hours decrease throughout the month of August in the Northern Hemisphere. At this point, you should stop any high-stress training, as the focus is now on bud development. For growers in the north who dread the upcoming fall, they can gain an advantage over the flowering period by creating a light deprivation system. By using a blackout material of some kind, you can trick your plants into thinking that autumn is closer than it really is, resulting in a faster harvest.

HARVEST (SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER)

This is the moment you've been waiting for: the harvest . Your plant will be ready for harvest from late September to late October. When the daylight hours dwindle and the heat of summer turns to bitter cold, it will be time to grab your pruning shears and start working to harvest those buds.

Plants will be ready for harvest when about 70% of the trichomes turn dull white. Depending on the weather and maturity stage of your buds, you can decide whether to do a progressive harvest instead of cutting the entire plant at once. A progressive harvest involves harvesting on a branch by branch basis, until all buds are equally ripe. This also involves less work during a day.

After having collected them, it will be time to savor the fruits of your work.

HARVEST (SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER)

This is the moment you've been waiting for: the harvest . Your plant will be ready for harvest from late September to late October. When the daylight hours dwindle and the heat of summer turns to bitter cold, it will be time to grab your pruning shears and start working to harvest those buds.

Plants will be ready for harvest when about 70% of the trichomes turn dull white. Depending on the weather and maturity stage of your buds, you can decide whether to do a progressive harvest instead of cutting the entire plant at once. A progressive harvest involves harvesting on a branch by branch basis, until all buds are equally ripe. This also involves less work during a day.

After having collected them, it will be time to savor the fruits of your work.

As we know, the southern European regions bring an abundance of light and heat, providing the perfect environment for many cannabis strains. Thanks to the higher temperatures throughout the year, the general calendar is a bit more lenient than that of a northern cultivation project. While there are many similarities in how plants should be managed, there are some key differences to be aware of.

Back to blog

Leave a comment

Please note, comments need to be approved before they are published.